Over Budget! Scare tactic?

If you’ve ever read a project management book, you’ve run across the statistic that 50 – 70% of all projects are over budget.  Seen that, right?

What’s up with that?  More times than not, I would guess that is a tactic to hook you into something.  Maybe, it’s to buy a book.  Or, a take a webinar, or buy consulting services.  Look closely at the context the next time you see that.  I will too.  Now I’ve gotten myself curious.  🙂

But I wonder how they know.  First off, only organizations that track their projects (time tracking, resource tracking, etc) know if they are over budget.  And most people don’t do that.  Instead, they fly by the seat of their pants, relying on hunches.

Secondly, so what?  When your project is finished, you’ve probably happy about that, and don’t care to look back – unless you’ve taken a real black eye.  It’s usually the fit-and-finish that takes three times longer than anticipated, but you’re always proud of the final product.  So why worry about a little extra moolah.

How’s your project coming?  Is it over budget yet?

–ray

Failure to Launch

How long does it take you to launch a new product? Doesn’t it always seem to take 2-3 times longer than anticipated? I’ve been involved in the launch of over fifty new products, and it’s always the same routine.

We have a great idea, which seems so simple. If we take our existing product and just tweak it a little here and there, we can introduce something new. Simple enough, right? Wrong.

Products take an incredible amount of time to mature. A few tweeks suddenly turns into a handful, and then more. Current products need attention, drawing your resources away from the new one. Excitement wains when people realize the instant payoff won’t be there. This is turning into work… We never expected this!

I’d like to hear your project team experiences with new products, and new revisions. How smooth is it for you?

–ray

Optimizing Organizational Performance

Have you heard of the “Optimizing Organizational Performance” webinar PMI is hosting?  It’s free, and the blurb looks good.  I’ve already registered.  Here’s the link below.

 http://www.amanet.org/events/optimizing-organizational-performance/

Here’s why you should attend:

AstroWix quote: Each year, an estimated $10 trillion is spent on projects around the world and almost 50% of them fail.

I’d like to hear your opinions, after the webinar.  What did you learn?  Was it over your head?  Beneath you?  Feel free to submit your comments here – that is, if you remember this blog posting after April 30th.

I personally don’t like heavyhanded project methodologies.  Anything heavier than a project plan, timesheet, and regular meetings bothers me.  I understand the need for process overhead, but sometimes people get carried away.  Of course, the simple approach assumes a top-down buy-in from upper management, something I always have.  Other organizations don’t have it so good.  So, let’s see how this PMI webinar works!

–ray

Do Project Plans Work For You?

Do you use project planning software like Microsoft Project to develop project plans?  How’s that working for you?  I have a problem with it, and I’d like to find an elegant solution.

What’s the problem?  Well, building project plans is no trouble.  I can lay down the phases and breakdowns, add tasks, and assign them to employees just fine.  That’s the easy part.  I can even track time to tasks.  The problem I have is managing them later.

Let’s face it, project plans go obsolete the first week you create them.  Something’s bound to change, and managing all those changes is hard.  Yes, I know that’s what the PMO office does.  But keeping project schedules current rubs me like a cheese grater.  It’s an unnecessary overhead, and almost never gets done right.  Tasks move, change scope, go away, get added, etc, etc, etc.  You know what a headache it is…

Anybody have a better way?

–ray

Dell Plant Closing

There’s almost nothing good you can say about a plant closing.  Especially with potentially 9,000 people losing their jobs.  (See: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Desktops-and-Notebooks/Dell-Closing-Austin-PC-Plant-in-Cost-Cutting-Drive/ )

The PC vendor announced March 31 that it would begin cutting costs and improving its efficiency in the second half of 2009 fiscal year. Besides announcing the closing of the Austin plant, Dell reaffirmed that it plans to eliminate nearly 9,000 positions as part of the cost cutting.

 The only thing I’d like to say is, “fight for it!”  I remember working for a huge company, where the average workday (in our engineering department) was five hours.  Of course, this was a 8-hour shift, but nobody worked it.  We got our coffee in the morning, caught up on the previous night’s adventures, and then did a little work before lunch.  After lunch, a little more work, and then water cooler discussions of the evening’s plans.

Needless to say, that company cut 40,000 jobs in the late 80’s.  I don’t remember ever fighting for the company’s survival, or even for competitive positioning.  The culture simply wasn’t there.

I’m sure this is not the case with Dell.  They are highly competitive.  Sometimes things like this are out of our control.  But let’s fight for our positions anyway!

–ray