Replenish Inventory By Work Order

The video below describes a sequence of events that automatically creates manufacturing work orders when inventory is low. (scroll down below video for more)

Let’s assume you pull items from inventory for manufacturing. (You manufacture something that includes other pre-built assemblies) You have to maintain stock of the pre-built items so they are always available for use in other product. Problem is, it’s hard to remember to restock inventory when it’s low. You may pull a few off the rack and never remember to replenish them. The last thing you want is to go back and find the rack empty! Now you’ve got to build those items before you can fulfill your orders.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you got an email when inventory stock fell? And even nicer if a new work order was created, telling you to build and replenish inventory? Such an automated system would let you keep inventory levels high enough to fulfill orders when they came in.

This video describes exactly how to do this.

The sequence goes something like this:

  1. BOM is scanned and deducted from inventory
  2. Stock quantity drops below a threshold
  3. New work order is automatically created
  4. Email notification is sent
  5. Employees build and replenish inventory from the work order
  6. Work order is completed and deactivated

Most of these steps are accomplished with barcode scanners on the shop floor. Employees may not realize the automation occurring in the background, but admins and project managers will appreciated it.

Barcode Scanners for Manufacturing

Which kind of barcode scanner should I buy? Which scanners work with Standard Time? How do you connect a barcode scanner to a computer? Can you use barcode scanners with a Windows tablet?

All these questions are answered in the short video below. Scroll down below the video for more…

Turns out, any barcode scanner works with Standard Time. Just plug it in and begin scanning. Actually, barcode scanners work exactly like keyboards. They connect to USB ports like keyboards and send text like keyboards. That enables them to connect to Standard Time like a keyboard and can start and stop a timer, plus scan inventory, materials and expenses. All this is many times faster than keyboards, and much more reliable.

You can print barcode labels with any word processor or spreadsheet. Just choose a barcode font like IDAutomation. Include an * asterisk before and after every label, and you’re ready to scan.

For about $150 you have a simple barcode scanning station for manufacturing shop floor use. Scan time and materials into Standard Time.